Thought-Provoking Statistics…

Over 75 percent of Utah’s population are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints


Families in Utah 
Utah ranked highest in the number of married-couple families, with an average of 63.2 percent.
Utah ranked highest in the number of family households, with 76.3 percent.
Utah ranked highest in the number of persons per family, with an average of 3.57.
Utah ranked first for the youngest total population, with nearly one-third of its population 17 years old or younger.
Utah ranked highest in the number of persons per household, with an average of 3.13.
Utah ranked third for the fewest number of single-headed households with children, with 7.7 percent. 

Education in Utah
Utah ranked fourth for the highest population of persons age 25 and over with a high school degree at minimum, totaling 91 percent.
Utah ranked 11th for the highest population of persons age 25 and over with a bachelor’s degree or higher, totaling 27.9 percent.
Utah ranked fifth for the highest percentage of ninth-grade students who graduated within four years, increasing from 77.8 percent in 1999 to 82.3 percent in 2000. 

Health in Utah 
Utah ranked first for the lowest prevalence of smoking, with 14 percent.
Utah ranked first for the lowest risk for heart disease, and was 20 percent below the national average.
Utah ranked first for the lowest number of cancer cases, with 239.5 cases per 100,000.
Utah ranked first for the lowest number of work days missed within a 30-day period due to physical or mental illness, with an average of under three days per month missed.
Utah ranked second for the lowest overall death rate, with only 5.6 deaths per 1,000.
Utah ranked second for lowest number of heart-disease mortalities, and was the most improved state since 1990.
Utah ranked third for best overall health in 2000, maintaining its high standing in this category during the past decade (second in 1994 and 1996; fourth in 1990; fifth in 1992, 1997 and 1998; and sixth in 1999).
Utah ranked fourth for the lowest infant mortality, and fifth in the nation for lowest total mortality. Utah ranked ninth in the nation for lowest premature death (death before age 75). 

Crime in Utah 
Utah ranked 12th for the lowest crime rate.
Utah’s index crime rate (murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, motor vehicle theft and arson) decreased 12.6 percent compared to 1999, and 29.7 percent compared to 1995. It was 5.3 percent lower than the national index crime rate and represented a 21-year low.
Utah’s violent crime rate (murder, rape, robbery and aggravated assault) decreased 8.8 percent compared to1999, and 25.1 percent compared to 1997. Utah’s rate was less than half the national rate and represented a 21-year low.
Utah’s property crimes (burglary, larceny, motor vehicle theft and arson) decreased 12.8 percent compared to 1999, and 30 percent compared to 1995. Utah’s rate was less than half the national rate and represented a 21-year low.
Utah’s burglary rate decreased 8.3 percent compared to 1999, 33.1 percent compared to 1997, and 56.9 percent compared to 1980. Utah’s rate was 33 percent lower than the national rate and represented a 21-year low.
Utah’s larceny rate decreased 12.9 percent compared to 1999, and 30.4 percent compared to 1995. This represented a 21-year low.
Utah’s murder rate decreased 3.7 percent compared to 1999, and was nearly one-third of the national rate. This represented a 21-year low.
Utah’s aggravated assault rate decreased 15.1 percent compared to 1999, and 29.5 percent compared to 1995. This represented a 21-year low.
Utah’s arson rate decreased 18.3 percent compared to 1999, and 53.7 percent compared to 1992. Utah’s rate was less than half the national rate and represented a 21-year low.
Utah’s robbery rate decreased 18.4 percent compared to 1997, and was less than half the national rate.
Utah’s motor vehicle theft rate decreased 20.1 percent compared to 1999, and 40 percent compared to 1997. Utah’s rate was 71 percent lower than the national rate.
Utah’s adult (18 and over) arrests for index crimes decreased 13.4 percent compared to 1999; juvenile (10-17) arrests for index crimes decreased 7.1 percent.
Utah’s adult arrests for violent crimes decreased 16.3 percent compared to 1999; juvenile arrests for violent crimes decreased 18 percent.
Utah’s adult arrests for property crimes decreased 13 percent compared to 1999; juvenile arrests for property crimes decreased 6.1 percent.

Other Utah Statistics 
Utah ranked highest in charitable giving.

Utah was the fourth fastest-growing state, with a 29.6-percent population increase during the past decade (from 1.7 million in 1990 to 2.2 million in 2000). Utah’s growth rate more than doubled the nation’s growth rate of 13.2 percent.

Latter-day Saint men and women were leaders of the womens suffrage movement, and Utah was the second place in the world where women had the right to vote.

A 1993 study published in Demography showed that Mormons marrying within their church are least likely of all Americans to become divorced. Only 13 percent of LDS couples have divorced after five years of marriage, compared with 20 percent for religiously homogamist unions among Catholics and Protestants and 27 percent among Jews.

A study by Stan Albrecht and Tim Heaton published in the Review of Religious Research in 1984 reported that opposite to the experience of most churches in the United States, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints become more religiously active as they become more educated.


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